Movie Review: Lucy

lucy1

Stars: Scarlett Johansson, Morgan Freeman, Min-Sik Choi, Amr Waked

Rated R for strong violence, disturbing images, and sexuality, Running time 90 minutes, Action/Sci-fi

Compare to: Limitless (2011), Transcendence (2014)

When a movie is based on a dated scientific principle, it can be a bit difficult to swallow whatever we’re given from that point on. And seeing as how Lucy‘s tagline is the story as well, then accepting what we’re shown can also be a big pill to swallow.

Though Hercules’ (Also opening today) strengths relied so much on Dwayne Johnson and his ability to look like a demigod, Lucy has Johansson at the center with attention paid much more to the things that happen around her, some of which is happening to her, while other things she causes. The result of this is a movie that makes sense if you’re speaking director/writer Luc Besson’s language.

And it’s the fun with this question that the movie has.

After a wild night of partying with a friend, college student Lucy is sent to drop off a suitcase for a friend. Clueless to the situation, she does it and ends up a drug mule by a Korean gangster. But the drugs she’s carrying isn’t just regular street junk but a test type. So when Lucy is introduced to this substance, it begins to unlock certain parts of her brain previously unused by the human race, which begins a mad dash for the rest of the drugs, as well as all the other secrets of the universe.

Note: It will include violence.

Note: It will include violence.

Car chases, gun fights, telekinesis, and all the other wonders Besson evidently likes to think would happen if more than 10% of your brain could be used are the story with a slight touch of humanity thrown in for good taste, just so we’re not feeling too left out in the cold with all of this “science” thrown in our face, it lets you know where Besson stands on the human race altogether.

Also, your brain gets great cell service if you can unlock it.

Also, your brain gets great cell service if you can unlock it.

Much of the audiences watching Lucy may get lost once Johansson’s character begins fully utilizing the powers of her mind but for the rest of us, that’s where things get fun.

Korean acting vet, Min-Sik Choi (Of Oldboy and I Saw the Devil fame) makes a small but important role as the drug lord that kidnaps innocent Lucy for his transportation of the exotic test drug. It’s the type of villain you root against from the beginning and we’re fine with that. There are the bad guys we can’t help but side with from time to time and then there’s this kind- the kind that cut open unsuspecting college students for his trade and doesn’t care if they live or die.

As ruthless as he is though, you can’t help but care about him only as much as Lucy does; the more of her brain she uses, the less important he becomes. There’s a kind of message in there as well, no?

A Besson Must: Two Suppressed guns held by the same character at some point must be present.

A Besson Must: Two Suppressed guns held by the same character at some point must be present.

Positives: An ‘in-and-out’ Action/Sci-fi. Interesting concept with cool action/visuals.

Negatives: An ‘in-and-out Action/Sci-fi. Ludicrous plot that everything hinges on, interchangeable actors laced throughout the film,

Grade: B-

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2 Responses to “Movie Review: Lucy”

  1. Heather Says:

    Did you intentionally insert this twice ?

    Though Hercules’ (Also opening today) strengths relied so much on Dwayne Johnson and his ability to look like a demigod, Lucy has Johansson at the center with attention paid much more to the things that happen around her, some of which is happening to her, while other things she causes. The result of this is a movie that makes sense if you’re speaking director/writer Luc Besson’s language.

    -heather

    • Taylor Says:

      I did actually, but the fact that you’re questioning makes me think other people will too so I took it out. I guess that’s a product of doing these things at three in the morning; some ideas just look better then.

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